Home   FAQs   New Arrivals   Specials   Pricing & Shipping   Location   Corporate Services   Why Choose Bookware?  
 Search:   
Call our store: 9955 5567 (from within Sydney) or 1800 734 567 (from outside Sydney)
 View Cart   Check Out   
 
Browse by Subject
 TAFE Accounting
 TAFE I.T./Computing
 TAFE - Other
I.T
 .NET
 Windows 8
 Adobe CS6
 Cisco
 CCNA 2012
 CCNP 2012
 Java
 VB
 ASP
 Web Design
 E-Commerce
 Project Management
 ITIL
 Macintosh
 Mobile Devices
 Linux
 Windows Server 2012
 SQL Server 2012
 SAP
Certification
 MCITP
 MCTS
Economics and Business
 Accounting
 Business Information Systems
 Economics
 Finance
 Management
 Marketing
 TAX
 Human Resources
Academic
 Law
 Nursing
 Medical
 Psychology
 Engineering

Java Web Services - Using Java in Service Oriented Architectures

by: Tyler Jewell, David Chappell

Notify me when in stock

On-line Price: $55.99 (includes GST)

Paperback package 276

20%Off Retail Price

You save: $14.00

This item is available to backorder. Usually ships within 7 - 10 working days

Retail Price: $69.99

Publisher: O'REILLY,March 2002

Category: JAVA Level: I/A

ISBN: 0596002696
ISBN13: 9780596002695

Add to Shopping Cart

Java Web Services shows you how to use SOAP to perform remote method calls and message passing; how to use WSDL to describe the interface to a web service or understand the interface of someone else's service; and how to use UDDI to advertise (publish) and look up services in each local or global registry. Java Web Services also discusses security issues, interoperability issues, integration with other Java enterprise technologies like EJB; the work being done on the JAXM and JAX-RPC packages, and integration with Microsoft's .NET services


      For many Java developers, web services appeared to come out of nowhere. Its advantages are clear: web services are platform-independent (like Java itself), language-agnostic (a clear advantage over Java RMI), can easily be tunneled through firewalls (an obvious benefit to anyone who has dealt with modern enterprise networks), object-oriented (we all know about that), and tends to be loosely coupled (allowing more flexible application development). But these advantages have been obscured by a cloud of hype and a proliferation of jargon that are difficult to penetrate. What are SOAP, UDDI, WSDL, and JAXM? To say nothing of JAXR, tModels, category bags, WSFL, and other friends? And assuming that you understand what they are, how do you do anything with them? Do they live up to their promises? Are they really the future of network computing, or a dead end?


  Java Web Services gives the experienced Java developer a way into the Web Services world. It helps you to understand what's going on, what the technologies mean and how they relate, and shows Java developers how to put them to use to solve real problems. You'll learn what's real and what isn't; what the technologies are really supposed to do, and how they do it. Java Web Services shows you how to use SOAP to perform remote method calls and message passing; how to use WSDL to describe the interface to a web service or understand the interface of someone else's service; and how to use UDDI to advertise (publish) and look up services in each local or global registry. Java Web Services also discusses security issues, interoperability issues, integration with other Java enterprise technologies like EJB; the work being done on the JAXM and

JAX-RPC packages, and integration with Microsoft's .NET services.


  The web services picture is still taking shape; there are many platforms and APIs to consider, and many conflicting claims from different marketing groups. And although web services are inherently language-independent, the fit between the fundamental principles on which Java and web services are based means that Java will almost certainly be the predominant language for web services development. If you're a Java developer and want to climb on the web services bandwagon, or if you only want to 'kick the tires' and find out what web services has to offer, you will find this book indispensable.


      

Table of Contents

Preface


  1. Welcome to Web Services


          What Are Web Services?


          Web Services Adoption Factors


          Web Services in a J2EE Environment


          What This Book Discusses


  2. Inside the Composite Computing Model


          Service-Oriented Architecture


          The P2P Model


  3. SOAP: The Cornerstone of Interoperability


          Simple


          Object


          Access


          Protocol


          Anatomy of a SOAP Message


          Sending and Receiving SOAP Messages


          The Apache SOAP Routing Service


          SOAP with Attachments


  4. SOAP-RPC, SOAP-Faults, and Misunderstandings


          SOAP-RPC


          Error Handling with SOAP Faults


          SOAP Intermediaries and Actors


  5. Web Services Description Language


          Introduction to WSDL


          Anatomy of a WSDL Document


          Best Practices, Makes Perfect


          Where Is All the Java?


  6. UDDI: Universal Description, Discovery, and Integration


          UDDI Overview


          UDDI Specifications and Java-Based APIs


          Programming UDDI


          Using WSDL Definitions with UDDI


  7. JAX-RPC and JAXM


          Java API for XML Messaging (JAXM)


          JAX-RPC


          SOAPElement API


          JAX-RPC Client Invocation Models


  8. J2EE and Web Services


          The SOAP-J2EE Way


          The Java Web Service (JWS) Standard


  9. Web Services Interoperability


          The Concept of Interoperability


          The Good, Bad, and Ugly of Interoperability


          Potential Interoperability Issues


          SOAPBuilders Interoperability


          Other Interoperability Resources


          Resources


  10. Web Services Security


          Incorporating Security Within XML


          XML Digital Signatures


          XML Encryption


          SOAP Security Extensions


          Further Reading


  Appendix. Credits


  Index