Home   FAQs   New Arrivals   Specials   Pricing & Shipping   Location   Corporate Services   Why Choose Bookware?  
 Search:   
Call our store: 9955 5567 (from within Sydney) or 1800 734 567 (from outside Sydney)
 View Cart   Check Out   
 
Browse by Subject
 TAFE Accounting
 TAFE I.T./Computing
 TAFE - Other
I.T
 .NET
 Windows 8
 Adobe CS6
 Cisco
 CCNA 2012
 CCNP 2012
 Java
 VB
 ASP
 Web Design
 E-Commerce
 Project Management
 ITIL
 Macintosh
 Mobile Devices
 Linux
 Windows Server 2012
 SQL Server 2012
 SAP
Certification
 MCITP
 MCTS
Economics and Business
 Accounting
 Business Information Systems
 Economics
 Finance
 Management
 Marketing
 TAX
 Human Resources
Academic
 Law
 Nursing
 Medical
 Psychology
 Engineering

Innovation + Equality: How to Create a Future That Is More Star Trek Than Terminator

by: Joshua Gans, Andrew Leigh and Lawrence H. Summers

On-line Price: $32.24 (includes GST)

Hardcover package 192

25%Off Retail Price

You save: $10.75

Sale Item - Special discount - limited stock!
_____________________
N.Sydney : In Stock

Retail Price: $42.99

Publisher: MIT PRESS,15.09.19

Category: Level:

ISBN: 026204322X
ISBN13: 9780262043229

Add to Shopping Cart

How to get more innovation and more equality.


Is economic inequality the price we pay for innovation? The amazing technological advances of the last two decades in such areas as artificial intelligence, genetics, and materials have benefited society collectively and rewarded innovators handsomely: we get cool smartphones and technology moguls become billionaires. This contributes to a growing wealth gap; in the United States; the wealth controlled by the top.01 percent of households equals that of the bottom ninety percent. Is this the inevitable cost of an innovation-driven economy? Economist Joshua Gans and policy maker Andrew Leigh make the case that pursuing innovation does not mean giving up on equality precisely the opposite. In this book, they outline ways that society can become both more entrepreneurial and more egalitarian.


All innovation entails uncertainty; there's no way to predict which new technologies will catch on. Therefore, Gans and Leigh argue, rather than betting on the future of particular professions, we should consider policies that embrace uncertainty and protect people from unfavorable outcomes. To this end, they suggest policies that promote both innovation and equality. If we encourage innovation in the right way, our future can look more like the cheerful techno-utopia of Star Trek than the dark techno-dystopia of The Terminator.